HU Professor: How the Internet of Things is Driving Government Technology Buys

The ever-expanding Internet of Things (IoT), where devices, vehicles and other items are embedded with software, sensors and connectivity, is also helping loosen government agencies’ purse strings. Cisco’s Internet of Everything site predicts a $4.6 trillion market in IoT for the public sector in smart cities, outfitting the next-generation worker, traffic management and other apps.

“Anything related to open data and data management will see big growth” as a result of IoT implementations, says Andrew Hacker, Cyber Security Expert in Residence at Harrisburg University (Pa.) of Science and Technology. He tells GPN that governments will need to beef up their IT and network security if manufacturers of IoT products don’t have adequate safeguards and shields from mischief-makers.

Hacker appears in Government Product News sharing his thoughts on what is driving government technology buys.  To read the article, click here! 

Hacker says IoT device manufacturers do not take security and privacy into consideration during product development, “so there needs to be technology solutions that can augment IoT to make systems secure and keep information private.” He says that Harrisburg University is working on one such technology that will help bake in security and privacy functions into IoT technologies.

The University is well positioned to address such topics, as it is home to the Government Technology Institute.  This  is the only one of its kind in Pennsylvania and a leader in harnessing technology to make good government great. GTI connects government technology leaders with the expertise of Harrisburg University faculty and advisors for education, training, resources, and networking. Government technology professionals use GTI to explore and collaborate on successful, cost-effective technology solutions for Pennsylvania.

GTI’s signature initiative, Pennsylvania’s sole Certified Government Chief Information Officer program, targets the unique challenges of public-sector IT executives. Today’s government CIOs require sophisticated skills sets in leadership, strategy, and management. CGCIO immerses them in comprehensive study of executive-level issues, including IT strategy and planning, governance, security, financing, and workforce development. Through CGCIO, current and aspiring senior-level IT executives earn a recognized credential and learn to manage the demands of their increasingly complex roles.

Under the leadership of GTI Director,  Charlie Gerhards, the GTI and its Centers of Excellence will support learning, IT innovation, entrepreneurship, and intergovernmental collaboration that enhances the technical, management, and leadership skills of the government workforce involved in information.

Harrisburg University is significantly supported in these initiatives by Computer Aid, Inc., Cisco, Unisys, Accenture, Comcast Business, Deloitte, KPMG, IBM, Microsoft, Symantec, SAS, Level (3), and Sigma Resources — partners collaborating on a vision of technology for the public good.

It’s this spirit of collaboration, vision, and promotion of technology for the public good that will make the Government Technology Institute a national standard.